Batanes · Philippines · Travel Tales

Sabtang Island, Part 2: On the way to the Chamantad-Tinyan Viewpoint

When you tour Sabtang Island, you actually see only the eastern side of the island, one that is near the coast.

After visiting the stone houses of Savidug, we took a long road to our next destination. Along the way, we stopped by a limestone kiln — essentially a hole in limestone-rich ground. They light the makeshift kiln up and “cook” the limestone for days until it can be used as a binder for the walls of the stone houses.

Me in a cheesy pose by the limestone kiln
Me in a cheesy pose by the limestone kiln

On the same long road, we were able to see an idjang, which — as mentioned in a previous entry — is a fortress used for habitation, but was also a fortification where Ivatans hid against enemies or invaders.

See if you can find the idjang here.
See if you can find the idjang here.
Savidug idjang
Savidug idjang

The idjang in Savidug not too difficult to find as it is greatly modified, as opposed to simply carved onto a landform like the Basco idjang.

Savidug idjang
Savidug idjang

The Savidug idjang has been a subject of archaeological investigations. Burial jars, Chinese ceramics, and foundations of stone houses have been excavated from here. (You can read about such an excavation here.)

Our eventual destination was the Chamantad-Tinyan viewpoint for some rugged, breathtaking views of the beach.

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Chamantad-Tinyan Viewpoint. A difficult, but doable, walk for a sprained person.

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Chamantad-Tinyan Viewpoint

At some point, your fellow tourists will spread out. It is a huge place. You are urged to go as far out as you can for the grandest views.

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And here, in Batanes, you will realize again and again what breathtaking views really mean.

Chamantad-Tinyan Viewpoint. You stand on top of a hill and look down on a white beach below.
Chamantad-Tinyan Viewpoint. You stand on top of a grassy cliff and look down on a white beach below.

And while we were at it, why not a post-nuptial picture? 🙂

Chos.
Chos.

We also got to try the vakul, or the headgear of the Ivatan females, while I sipped on fresh coconut juice and ate its soft, juicy meat.

Me in a Vakul
Me in a vakul

I urge you to buy your pasalubongs here, particularly the tubho tea. We were able to buy one pack for P35, whereas other stores would sell them for P50. I also bought a couple of ref magnets that look like stone houses for P70 — they’re a bit steep, but they look nicer compared to the others I have seen.

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